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23 and I will tell you how your DNA affects your diabetes risk

M OUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. – Because more people get genetic testing to assess the risk of cancer and other serious diseases, diabetes has almost been omitted – largely due to the difficulty of developing a useful test. But in the South at the Southwest festival on Sunday, the Consumer Genome announced the giant 23andMe that it should now tell its customers how their DNA affects their chances of developing type 2 diabetes, a condition better known for its link to environmental factors than genetics [19659003] 23andMe's new report will be available online on Monday at no additional cost to most of its existing customers, as well as new customers who trade $ 1 99 and a saliva sample for them and a whole host of other results. [19659005] advertisement The new test moves 23andMe to a disease that is expected to affect two fifths of American population of adults during their lifetime. But it is not at all clear if it will provide additional value beyond the benefit of existing screening programs that simply ask people about things such as their lifestyle habits and their genealogy. Such questionnaires and genetic testing "have not been compared to the head of the head, and so it is unknown whether genetic screening would retrieve patients previous or more patients who either have prediabetes or diabetes," said Dr. Tom Donner, head of the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Diabetes Center. 23 and I built the test Using genetic data from more than 2.5 million of its…

M OUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. – Because more people get genetic testing to assess the risk of cancer and other serious diseases, diabetes has almost been omitted – largely due to the difficulty of developing a useful test.

But in the South at the Southwest festival on Sunday, the Consumer Genome announced the giant 23andMe that it should now tell its customers how their DNA affects their chances of developing type 2 diabetes, a condition better known for its link to environmental factors than genetics [19659003] 23andMe’s new report will be available online on Monday at no additional cost to most of its existing customers, as well as new customers who trade $ 1

99 and a saliva sample for them and a whole host of other results. [19659005] advertisement

The new test moves 23andMe to a disease that is expected to affect two fifths of American population of adults during their lifetime. But it is not at all clear if it will provide additional value beyond the benefit of existing screening programs that simply ask people about things such as their lifestyle habits and their genealogy.

Such questionnaires and genetic testing “have not been compared to the head of the head, and so it is unknown whether genetic screening would retrieve patients previous or more patients who either have prediabetes or diabetes,” said Dr. Tom Donner, head of the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Diabetes Center.

23 and I built the test Using genetic data from more than 2.5 million of its customers who had agreed to participate in research. The test analyzes over 1000 genetic variants to generate what is known as a polygenic risk score, which can be considered a kind of genetic credit value. It then adjusts that score based on a customer’s self-reported ethnicity and age.

For example, a 40-year-old who identifies as Latina can be told that she has a 79% chance of developing type 2 diabetes at some point in the next four decades.

The company said it was decided that it does not need to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration to market the test. Instead, it developed its new report by following the FDA’s guidance for developing products intended for health. The FDA has previously authorized 23andMe to sell breast cancer, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s risk assessment tests, among other conditions.

In its new diabetes risk report, 23andMe takes pain to distinguish between genetic risk and overall risk, the latter of which can be affected by lifestyle. 23andMe’s report urges its customers to take common ground tips such as “maintaining a healthy weight”, “becoming active”, “eating healthy” and “not smoking” – good advice for almost everyone, regardless of their genetic risk of developing diabetes .

The report also encourages customers to talk to a clinician who can make a diagnosis or to consider a diabetes prevention program. It links to a service offered by Lark Health, a Silicon Valley chatbot coaching service that 23andMe made a deal in January. Lark’s Diabetes Prevention Program costs $ 20 per month for people whose insurance companies will not cover it.

When 23andMe launches the new report, “a lot of people will be told they are at increased risk,” Emily Drabant Conley, corporate vice president of business development, told reporters at a briefing last week at the corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley. “So it can cause them to care if they can actually be diagnosed.”

23andMe’s test is for consumers, but there are good reasons why diabetes-genetic risk assessments have not yet been adopted in clinical care, Donner said.

“Until genetic screening has been shown to improve the discovery of patients with diabetes over and beyond the standard of care, doctors will not look to order tests where there is a cost without knowing that it will be an advantage,” Said Donner.

Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief physician at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, said he just thinks the time will tell if the 23andMe test sends risk patients to see a doctor who wouldn’t otherwise. But he welcomes the potential.

“We need to find ways to encourage them to make sure they are being screened for diagnosis,” Gabbay said. “Everything that increases the likelihood of it, the better.”

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